Wertung
91/100
Chapelle-Chambertin 2012
Grand Cru AC, MO, Domaine Drouhin-Laroze
Burgund
2012
75 cl
 
Wertung
91/100
Chapelle-Chambertin 2012
Grand Cru AC, MO, Domaine Drouhin-Laroze
Burgund
2012
75 cl
Art. Nr. 18011
Verfügbare Menge 12
Anzahl
Preis/Fl.
CHF  91.00 exkl. 7.7% MwSt
Auf die Wunschliste
ODER
Wertungen
91/93
Wine Advocate
Neal Martin
The 2012 Chapelle-Chambertin Grand Cru demands coaxing from the glass, unfurling to reveal blackcurrant and fresh strawberry scents, joined by a hint of violet with time. The palate has a good backbone. This is a more masculine take on the vineyard, nicely balanced, linear and taut with fine precision and nuance on the finish. This should age with style. This domaine must possess one of the most enviable portfolios in the Cote de Nuits, with several grand crus to their name scattered across 11.5-hectares of prime vineyard. So I guess one must ask the question why Drouhin-Laroze is not better known? I suppose you could argue that in the past, the wines had an air of commerciality about them, wines that were commendable and enjoyable, yet rarely approached the profundity of say Rousseau or Bachelet. Their intrinsic quality was not in doubt. The trouble is that when you have such a roll call of iconic grand crus to your name, the bar is simply raised. Personally, I have found much pleasure in previous vintages that always seem to show well in barrel. I have always found winemaker Philippe Drouhin to be a conscientious vigneron, usually with his wife Christine by his side, either in the office or pouring wines at tastings. And there is now a gradual changing over to the sixth generation as their son Nicolas and daughter Caroline, gain more involvement in the running of the estate that now includes a negociant arm overseen by Caroline. Tasting through their 2012s, there does remain a slight “heaviness” to the wines that you could align with say, Bernard Dugat, and that does not mean they are inherently inferior – just that it is a perceptible leitmotif that means they rarely contain the finesse or effortlessness of those aforementioned growers. I always come away thinking if that if they just tweaked their practices a little, they could suddenly see their wines capture that sense of magic – perhaps pick a little earlier, extract less and moderate the level of new wood that has always made an impression e.g. reconsider using 100% new oak for all the grand crus. This is an estate to watch. They have always quietly gone about creating very good wines, but it would not take much with those grand crus to see them suddenly elevated to the top league.